How a Navy SEAL sets up his War Belt | Duty Belt | Tactical Rifleman





This week on Tactical Rifleman, I review the basic setup and components of one configuration of my war belt I utilized in the SEAL Teams. Much like the body armor setup video, the war belt is also not a one-size fits all setup. Team guys set up their kit in a manner that both fits their load bearing requirements and comfort as well as achieving the minimum loadout for their position in the platoon. Now, there is nothing sexy about this setup. Due to the maritime component of SEAL operations, salt water wreaks havoc upon gear. Therefore, the kit I carry is designed for function and is predominately a maritime setup (Visit Board Search Seizure (VBSS)/Zodiac work/Diving, etc.). I use a more high-speed setup when operating in a direct action or land warfare capacity. That means that the kit is a bit nicer and more expensive in order to stand up to a harsh, dryer environment as well as to carry additional ordnance items and communications equipment.

The components on the belt are a bit of a “hodge podge” of different brands of gear; some of it issues and some of it scrounged from the DRMO (recycle) bin (yes, SEALs sometimes have to dive into the “land of abandoned gear” for stuff). The point is, you don’t need all the hyped-up Gucci gear to do work. You just need something durable yet easily replaceable. We put our kit through hell during training evolutions and this rig is a basically the stuff that survived that crucible over the years. The belt itself and pad are Blackhawk. The mag pouches are from my basic loadout package and are of no name brand. They simply Velcro shut when not in use and have a plastic internal piece to keep the mags from sliding around. The large drop (olive drab) pouch is from London Bridge trading and is basically a SAW ammo pouch I use as a large utility bag. The drop-leg holster is from 5-11 and is modular detachable meaning I can swap my Glock 34 holster for my Beretta holster (when training Air Force dudes) pretty easily. The SSE roll-up drop pouch is from Tactical Assault Gear (https://www.tacticalassaultgearstore.com/) which is a veteran-owned founded company all made in the USA. Great stuff! Canteen pouch is Blackhawk. The knife is a SOG SEAL pup. I realize that gear has advanced over the years and the team at Tactical Rifleman have most likely used a variety of these items across the spectrum. Please feel free to leave constructive comments and questions below. Stay violent, my friends!

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